Madonna on The Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Artists, 500 Greatest Albums of all time and MORE

9 Mai 2013, 19:14pm

Publié par MadonnaArtVision

 

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Look at the different categories established at Rolling Stone or Madonna is present !


 

The RS 100 GREATEST ARTISTS

 

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# 36 - Madonna 

I'm sorry, but I'd rather meet Madonna than the president of the United States.

Madonna has this thing about her that you can't explain — the thing that makes somebody a star. When she walks into the room, you just have to take notice. She's so comfortable with herself, and she's not afraid to live life to the fullest and to say whatever she feels, no matter what anyone thinks. There's something kind of childlike about that; it's a beautiful, amazing thing.

Madonna was the first female pop star to take control of every aspect of her career and to take responsibility for creating her image, no matter how much flak she might get. She's proved that she can do so many different things — music and movies and being a parent, too. Her music has become iconic: Songs like "Holiday" or "Live to Tell" are timeless — not just disposable hits. They feel like home. She has her spells of being moody and vibey and spiritual, but her words are so easy to relate to. She's a diva and does what she wants, but she's a loving person.

The first time I met her was when I flew to visit her at one of her shows in 2001. I walked into her dressing room, and her daughter, Lola, was there, and I felt really nervous. I said to Madonna, "Can I just hug you?" I was so stupid! But she was so nice about it. I would definitely not be here, doing what I'm doing, if it wasn't for Madonna. I remember being eight or nine years old, running around my living room singing and dancing and wanting so much to be like her. All my girlfriends still listen to her stuff. We're all mesmerized by her. Madonna's stage presence has inspired so many artists. You can see her influence in the recent generations of artists who have picked up some of her moves and have been influenced by her style.

Madonna has done so much, and she's been around so long, and the bitch still looks good! She's spent years in the public eye, and that can be really hard for anyone to deal with. But she dug deep and started writing from her heart. Madonna has so much light inside her, and she's so much more noticeable than all of the rest of us. She stuck to what she believed in and did what she felt. It's part of her art — to just be herself.

 

The RS 500 GREATEST ALBUMS OF ALL TIME

 

The Rolling Stone 500 was assembled by the editors of Rolling Stone, based on the results of two extensive polls. In 2003, Rolling Stone asked a panel of 271 artists, producers, industry executives and journalists to pick the greatest albums of all time. In 2009, we asked a similar group of 100 experts to pick the best albums of the 2000s. From those results, Rolling Stone created this new list of the greatest albums of all time.

 

# 184 - The Immaculate Collection

A perfect Madonna CD: You get timeless pop such as "Holiday," provocations like "Papa Don't Preach," dance classics like "Into the Groove" and a then-new Lenny Kravitz-produced sex jam, "Justify My Love," which samples Public Enemy.

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# 239 - Like a Prayer

"I like the challenge of merging art and commerce," Madonna said. She won artistic recognition with her most personal set of songs, including "Till Death Do Us Part" and "Oh Father"; commerce with "Express Yourself" and the title track, whose video had the Vatican talking about blasphemy.

 

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# 367 - Ray of Light

For her first disc as a mother, Madonna and producer William Orbit showed the world that electronica doesn't have to be cold. Songs like the title track and "Nothing Really Matters" are filled with warmth and wonder. Ray also features her best singing ever.

 

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The RS 100 BEST ALBUMS OF THE EIGHTIES

 

# 50 - Madonna, First album

Five years after arriving in New York City from her hometown of Pontiac, Michigan, Madonna Louise Ciccone had little to show for a lot of work. By 1982, she had managed to get only a few gigs singing with drummer Stephen Bray's band, the Breakfast Club, at clubs like CBGB and Max's Kansas City, and the future looked far from bright.

"I had just gotten kicked out of my apartment," Madonna says, "so the band let me live in their rehearsal space at the Music Building, on Eighth Avenue. Stephen had keys to all the rehearsal rooms, so when I decided to make my own demos, we'd go into other people's studios at night and use their four-track machines."

Armed with a tape, Madonna began making the rounds of New York's dance clubs. "I had heard that a lot of A&R people hung out at the clubs," she says, "and I thought trying to go see them at their offices would be a waste of time." It proved a good strategy: Through Mark Kamins, the DJ at Danceteria, the tape found its way to Sire Records, and Madonna was signed by label president Seymour Stein. "Seymour was in the hospital at the time," she says. "I got signed while he was lying in bed in his boxer shorts."

The contract with Sire guaranteed just one single, but it had options for recording albums as well. With Kamins producing, Madonna cut the moody disco track "Everybody" as her debut single. But when Sire picked up its option to record an album, she decided to try a different producer. "I wanted someone who'd worked with a lot of female singers," she says.

Reggie Lucas, the Grammy-winning songwriter who had produced Stephanie Mills and Roberta Flack, was selected. After recording the album's second single, the Lucas-penned "Physical Attraction," he and Madonna cut the rest of the album, with the exception of "Holiday," which was produced by Jellybean Benitez.

"Things were very informal and casual," Lucas says of the sessions. "It was my first pop project, and she was just a new artist. I had no idea it would be the biggest thing since sliced bread."

Indeed, initial response to Madonna gave no indication of the mania to follow. It took a year and a half for the album to go gold. But its assured style and sound, as well as Madonna's savvy approach to videos, helped the singer make the leap from dance diva to pop phenom, and it pointed the direction for a host of female vocalists from Janet Jackson to Debbie Gibson.

"It influenced a lot of people," says Madonna, who cites Chrissie Hynde and Debbie Harry as her own musical heroes. "I think it stands up well. It just took a long time for people to pay attention to me —and I thank God they did!"

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The RS 100 BEST ALBUMS OF THE NINETIES

 

# 28 - Ray of Light 

Madonna finally gets back into the groove, rocking the dance beats that made her a star in the first place, for her most shamelessly disco album since You Can Dance. Madonna's rhythm resurrection sounds like some kind of spiritual transformation, and since it accompanied her discovery of yoga and motherhood, it probably was. Producer William Orbit plugs in the techno gadgets, but it's Madonna's passion that makes the loudest bang, on powerhouse tracks like "Drowned World/Substitute for Love" and "Little Star." And in the title smash, Madonna throws herself a tantrum on the global dance floor as if she'd never been away.


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The RS 100 BEST SONGS OT THE 2000S

 

# 76 - Hung Up

Going back to disco, as she always does and always should, the queen hustled up a chintzy-sounding Abba sample, a drag queen's wet dream of a chorus, and Stuart Price's electrobeats. The result? One of her most captivating hits ever — and thanks to those deceptively hard-hitting lyrics, one of her most personal.


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The 100 BEST DEBUT ALBUMS OF ALL TIME

#96 - Madonna, First Album

 The artist herself would later dismiss the post-disco pop on her debut as "the aerobics album." But it didn't just succeed in introducing the most important female voice in the history of modern music, it's also aged much better sonically than Like A Virgin, her blockbuster 1984 follow-up. Loaded with hits like "Borderline" and "Holiday" (the latter produced by her then-boyfriend, John "Jellybean" Benitez) and the great communal anthem "Everybody," it put downtown New York electro grooves all over the Top 40. Fun fact: it also works great as aerobics music.